An Introduction to Cat5e Ethernet Cables

eiodotcom —  August 21, 2012 — 6 Comments

Today’s Eio post is on Cat5e Networking Cables.

Cat5 is short for a category 5 cable, also known as an Ethernet cable. These cables are meant to carry signals, most commonly used in structured cabling for computer networks. They can also carry telephony and video signals. Most Cat-5 cables are unshielded wire containing four pairs of 24-gauge twisted copper pairs, terminating in an RJ-45 jack. If a wire is certified as Cat-5 and not just a twisted pair wire, it will have “Cat-5” printed on the shielding. Cat5e cables replaced the Cat5 cables. The “E” stands for “enhanced” specification.

According to Wisegeek:

“The outer sheath of Cat-5 cable can come in many colors, with bright blue being quite common. Inside, the twisted pairs are also sheathed in plastic with a standard color scheme: Solid orange, blue, green and brown wires twisted around mates that are white and striped with a solid color. The twisted pairs inside a Cat-5 cable reduce interference and crosstalk, and should be left twisted except at the termination point. Some experts recommend untwisting only ½ inch (12.7 mm) of the pairs to strip and make connections. Cat-5 cable can be purchased off a spool in varying lengths, or bought pre-cut to standard lengths with RJ-45 jacks already attached.”

Cables To Go 15202 10ft Cat5E 350 MHz Snagless Patch Cable – Black

For voice/data/video distribution, it will handle bandwidth-intensive applications up to 350 MHz. Meets all Cat5E TIA/EIA standards, and drastically reduces both impedance and structural return loss (SRL) when compared to standard 100 MHz wire.

Each of the individual pairs is bonded together to help maintain the twist-spacing throughout the line right up to the termination point.

Constructed from high-quality cable and a shortened body plug, this design minimizes Near-End Crosstalk (NEXT) levels.

The molded, snagless boot prevents unwanted cable snags during installation and provides extra strain relief. Available in a variety of colors to easily color-code your network installation.

Connector 1: RJ45 Male
Connector 2: RJ45 Male

Cables To Go 24399 75ft Cat5E 350 MHz Assembled Patch Cable – Blue

For voice/data/video distribution, it will handle bandwidth-intensive applications up to 350 MHz. Meets all Cat5E TIA/EIA standards, and drastically reduces both impedance and structural return loss (SRL) when compared to standard 100 MHz wire.

Each of the individual pairs is bonded together to help maintain the twist-spacing throughout the line right up to the termination point.

Constructed from high-quality cable and a shortened body plug, this design minimizes Near-End Crosstalk (NEXT) levels. Available in a variety of colors to easily color-code your network installation.

Connector 1: RJ45 Male
Connector 2: RJ45 Male

TRIPP LITE N002-007-BL 7 ft. Cat 5E Blue Network Cable

Feature molded connectors with integral strain relief
PVC 4-pair stranded UTP
Rated for 350MHz/ 1Gbps communication
Meets most current industry standards including IEEE 802.3ab, IEEE 802.5, ANSI/EIA/TIA 568, ISO/IEC 11801 and ETL (category 5e draft 11)

TRIPP LITE N010-010-GY 10 ft. Cat 5E Gray Shielded Cat5e 350MHz Cross-over Molded Cable

Cabling for category 5 (Cat5) and 5e (Cat5e) applications
Length: 10-ft. color: gray with green connectors. Connectors: RJ45 male
Cross-over wiring designed to connect hub-to-hub or PC-to-PC
Feature molded connectors with integral strain relief
Snagless design protects the locking tabs on the RJ45 connectors from being damaged or snapped off during installation
PVC 4-pair stranded UTP
Rated for 350MHz/ 1Gbps communication
Meets most current industry standards including IEEE 802.3ab, IEEE 802.5, ANSI/EIA/TIA 568, ISO/IEC 11801 and ETL (category 5e draft 11)
Available in other lengths
Warranteed to be free from defects in materials and workmanship for life

See also:

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